Act

  • Act commented on the post, NaRe 2020 Day 14 1 day, 22 hours ago

    ohmygod the next sentence

    idk what I was expecting but it was definitely not that

  • Is it just me, or is there a real power creep problem here? I mean, we’re on the fourth(?) book, and we’ve already gone from “detective doing local cases that the authorities don’t care about” to “a worldwide vampire/wizard war and international poltics by ancient immortals.” Could Butcher not keep up the original premise for even a little while?…[Read more]

  • I wonder what “Bah” in Latin is.

    Maybe he was going for the sheep sound. Taking the “wolf in sheep’s clothing” thing very literally.

  • I can’t recreate it in either browser D:

  • Act commented on the post, NaRe 2020 Day 8 1 week, 3 days ago

    I love this and request more

  • Act commented on the post, NaRe 2020 Day 7 1 week, 5 days ago

    This could be the blog’s tagline, honestly.

  • One was Djuna Barnes; I don’t remember who the other was.

  • RE: Comments: I’m not having any problems — could it be an adblocker issue?

  • Huh. Please don’t take this as a criticism, but the writing is much more personal, even informal, than I’d have expected from a class assignment. That actually makes for much better reading, though!

    Part of that is the nature of the assignment, but I also think that part of the point with Lit Crit writing is to give your opinion on things, so…[Read more]

  • I CAN’T GET OVER THIS. Why does he talk like he’s from 1870??? If Butcher is racist, how is he a racist from the middle ages instead of 1990? Was he like, only exposed to people over the age of 95 during his formative years? i can’t stop trying to figure this out send help

  • This one needs some context:

    My final project for one of my classes this semester was an annotated bibliography of recent critical works I thought were useful, so I basically wrote a quickpost in Academese for […]

    • Valente, Catherynne M. The Refrigerator Monologues. Saga Press, 2017.

      Yesss, this one is good. There isn’t much to say about this book: it’s a very concise, very evocative, and very acerbic critique of the way female characters are used in comics.

      Kröger, Lisa, et al. Monster, She Wrote: The Women Who Pioneered Horror & Speculative Fiction. Quirk Books, 2019.

      Shame it fell short of your standards. I would be interested in reading a more comprehensive overview of women’s role in horror genre.

      Here in 2019, people are still trying to wrestle authorship of Frankenstein away from Mary Shelley in favor of her husband.

      Oh yeah, I remember this theory. What a load of bullshit.

      Zuckerberg, Donna. Not All Dead White Men: Classics and Misogyny in the Digital Age. Harvard University Press, 2019.

      This one looks intriguing. I should check it out.

      Also, on topic of women and afterlife, here is something you may like:

    • Huh. Please don’t take this as a criticism, but the writing is much more personal, even informal, than I’d have expected from a class assignment. That actually makes for much better reading, though!

      She also criticizes classicists for their propensity for allowing texts to become decontextualized (no pun intended) under the assumption that those interested in the texts themselves will seek out the context.

      Both medieval and classical academia have been trying to deal with the same issue for years now, particularly in light of the continued reappropriation of classical and medieval themes and imagery to serve conservative and white supremacist agendas.

      • At this point, a straight telling of the story of King Arthur would be more shocking than a gritty reimagining of it. I can’t think of one western property, that has done King Arthur more justice than the Fate franchise has, from the last few decades. And they made Arthur and Mordred girls!

        • Sorry, I was thinking more along the lines of, say, “papers and books about King Arthur” than “works based on King Arthur”. :-) Or, to put it another way, it’s an issue of “why classicists should care that conservatives ignore the widespread racial diversity in Imperial Rome”, or “medievalists should care that white supremacists and various public figures are coopting crusader imagery”, and so on and so forth.

          Fun academic fact of the day: there are white supremacists to this day who employ imagery of Saint Maurice’s eagle without knowing he was, in fact, a black man.

      • Huh. Please don’t take this as a criticism, but the writing is much more personal, even informal, than I’d have expected from a class assignment. That actually makes for much better reading, though!

        Part of that is the nature of the assignment, but I also think that part of the point with Lit Crit writing is to give your opinion on things, so I tend toward a more personal style. It’s definitely different than how I write, say, here, but it’s also still my voice, which I think sometimes isn’t true when people try to transition from casual writing to academic. Trying to maintain one’s own perspective is something I actually try to teach, because I think it’s important.

    •  Showalter is also weirdly beholden to the idea of literary canons as institutions, as well as the idea that texts seem to have some objective literary value that The Learned, like herself, can be the true arbitrators of.

      Isn’t this just Academese for “she’s an academic”?

       and in one particularly baffling case suggested two writers were friends because they both had “bizarre names,”

      … My morbid curiosity forces me to ask what they were.

      (did she expect anyone to deeply identify with the Wii Tennis Miis on an emotional level?)

      “They’re literally called Miis! Don’t you see the symbolism!?”

    • APen replied 2 weeks ago

      The Literary Witches book sounds really interesting! I find teratology stuff fascinating, so to see that applied to female authorship sounds awesome. Plus I love Agatha Christie.

      Your concluding paragraphs really spoke to me:

      “I believe with a deep conviction that the stories we tell each other matter. They are not just a reflection of who we are, but an agent of who we will become. They say more about us than our history, our science, our math”

      I agree :)

      (ps: admin issue, but for some reason I can’t input text into the comment box while logged in. This happening to anyone else?)

       

       

      • RE: Comments: I’m not having any problems — could it be an adblocker issue?

        • I recall seeing a similar issue when I was not logged in: the comment box appeared as an unclickable black box. It’s gone now, though. Could be tied to browser update.

    • Chrome: it won’t load unsafe scripts unless you tell it to. If you look at the area next to the address bar, there’s a shield icon that you can click to fix the box.

  • My first thought was, “Wow, was this someone who actually understood the books?” And then I wondered about something else, and found an answer:

    This is the creator and writing staff. It was created by a woman, and the writers are a 50/50 split.
    It’s almost like it matters to have minority writers!

  • Canted Oriental eyes, dark, rich skins of Africa, pale Europeans,

    I’m convinced Butcher is approximately 150 years old, because even racists born in 1970 don’t talk like this.

  • Act commented on the post, Kill la Kill 3 weeks, 5 days ago

    I haven’t watched KlK, but I’ve also been finding lately that I care far, far more about women being meaningfully involved in stories than I do about costuming. I think it’s at least partially that crappy costuming is so rote and samey that it’s ignorable if the camera ignores it — as long as, say, a game doesn’t linger on upskirt shots (hellooo,…[Read more]

  • Act commented on the post, Misc Discussion Post 1 month ago

    Honestly the stupidly racist depiction of the Irish Weasleys in the very first book should have been a tipoff.

  • I’ve been thinking about this (for whatever reason), and to elaborate a bit:
    I’ve found that Western reviewers have tended to pan SaGa games for exactly the things I like them for: a more open-world jRPG with no long handholding period before you can explore; lots of sidequests where you can accidentally run into enemies to strong for you too…[Read more]

  • Act commented on the post, Misc Discussion Post 1 month ago

    Don’t forget about all the weird Native American stuff from a few years ago!

  • I found the first three GameBoy games to be surprisingly playable considering their age. I’ve honestly never had a problem with the levelling system; it’s weird, but it works surprisingly well, and it’s pretty nice to see an RPG trying something that isn’t just Final Fantasy’s system reskinned.

  • The resolution reminds me very uncomfortably of my own Christian upbringing’s “you’re suffering because god says you deserve, stop being a shit and you’ll stop suffering” morality. I’m suspicious of the story ending with her deciding God is right and we should suffer if we suck instead of killing god and freeing the world. The options in a truly…[Read more]

  • I honestly don’t remember any anime trend that’s had the market saturation of isekai in my lifetime. Even during the magical girl heyday, not every single thing being released was magical girl, but each time I see a new anime/LN announcement it’s another fucking isekai.

    I wonder if this isn’t some unholy conglomeration of anime, web writing,…[Read more]

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