Umineko – Legend of the Golden Witch – Extras

There’s still some more extras that pop up after finishing the Tea Party.

The first appears on the main menu as “???”. Welcome to the Tea Party of those who are not human reads the description.

Hah, the music is like Ghosts n Stuff.

Damn, R07 went all-out with the special effects.

“…What sort of black tea shall I prepare next? Allow me to display every refined tea that ever was and ever shall be.”

OH SHIT

RIKAAAAA

<333333333333

“…Dried plum black tea. The kind at 200 yen a pack.”

Incidentally, Furuderika’s old-school sprite is much better, IMO, although I’m not going to make a gif using it when I can crib from others, because internet.

Beatrice and Bernkastel apparently have some bad blood.

“*cackle*cackle*! For a thousand years, I have been fond of black tea, but I did not know of such a thing. I will never tire of living in this world.”

“…Beato. You don’t have to display such hostility. I am just a wandering witch. I didn’t come with the intention of violating the rules of your territory.”

 “*cackle*cackle*, there is not even a sliver of hostility. I am just terribly concerned about seeing that the legendary witch, Lady Bernkastel, is well attended to.”

 “…You misunderstand. I am powerless. Before a witch such as you, who possesses the dreadful power to kill an individual a hundred times, I am completely powerless.”

“That a powerless Lady Witch like you possesses a power that none can approach is what is truly terrifying. After all, that Great Witch, Lady Lambdadelta, was dethroned by you alone.”

Incidentally, I wonder if Bernkastel takes offense to Beatrice’s saying she likes this existence.

“…I only won an endurance contest. She simply got tired.”

 “That is not what Lady Lambdadelta said though. *cackle*cackle*cackle*, too much humility can be unseemly, Lady Bernkastel.”

At this, Bernkastel teleports to the side, seemingly to talk to us.

“……That girl has a dreadful power. …………The power to kill an individual ‘without fail’. However, ‘without fail’ doesn’t exist in this world. No matter how many times you divide 1, you can never reach zero. That girl has the power to bring the odds of failure down to ‘almost exactly zero’… the power to give rise to ‘almost perfect certainty’. ……I hope I never have to fight such a terrifying witch again.”

Beatrice overhears, though.

“However, you have the power to cause success without fail, ‘as long as the odds are not zero’. ……Although you say ‘without fail’ doesn’t exist in this world, you possess an infallible power yourself. ……How very terrifying, *cackle*cackle*cackle*…!”

“…The power to kill an individual ‘endlessly’…I think you’re the more terrifying one.”

“Such jests. From your point of view, mine is but a trifling power. This is most certainly what one would call empty praise.”

Hmm. Could Lambadelta be referring to Takano, or is this someone in the Umineko universe?

“……Call it flattery to make up for the cost of staying here. …I am a fleeing traveler who crosses the Fragments continually running from boredom. ……I simply came around because I’d heard that you’d started something interesting. Have no doubts that I will choose to leave as soon as you are no longer interesting.”

“*cackle*cackle*! I, Beatrice, am deeply and humbly delighted to have the great Lady Bernkastel as an observer. *cackle*cackle*! And so, your impression?”

“Lambdadelta is terrifying because of her cruelty… however, she is a girl I can understand. You do seem to possess affection, but I can’t understand you at all. That’s why you’re much more terrifying than her.”

This is a good point and frankly, whoever Bernkastel dislikes I don’t like, so screw you, Beatrice.

“*cackle*cackle*cackle*! I am fickle by nature. Do forgive me. Besides, I believe you also enjoy trusting your fate to the roll of fickle dice, right, Lady Bernkastel?”

“…When I roll the dice, I have a roll I clearly want to get. Unlike you. You, on the other hand, never let the dice fall from your hand. So, whatever the roll might have been, you’re never disappointed. Whatever roll the dice show you, you are satisfied ‘without fail’. ………In that sense, you far surpass me. ………You’re one I really don’t want to fight with. Inside of you, there’s nothing but zero. That’s why I can’t win against you with my power. …The worst compatibility. ……Perhaps Lambdadelta, on the other hand, has a good compatibility against you. Since she would be able to kill your ‘endless’.”

This is an interesting way of putting it.

“*cackle*cackle*, *cackle*cackle*cackle*! Oh yes, witches truly are the best people to drink black tea with. One doesn’t get bored. *cackle*cackle*!”

 “Then, I’m relieved. Boredom is the only poison that can kill me. So, don’t kill me, alright? Lady Beatrice, Endless Witch.”

“If such is your wish, I, Beatrice, shall show you an even better time. In that case, wouldn’t it be best if I brought the next chessboard in right away? It seems that the next tale would do more for you than a refill of black tea.”

“…”

“Just wait for a moment. *cackle*cackle*!”

With Beatrice MIA, Bernkastel takes another opportunity to turn to the camera.

……..something troublesome seems to have taken a liking to you. I’d really like to lend you my power, but, as you just heard, that girl’s power and mine have a very bad compatibility. Unfortunately.

But you really are pitiful, so I’ll help you out just a bit.

First of all, about that girl. She does have the name Beatrice, but that doesn’t necessarily mean she is ‘one individual woman.’

Hmmm.

See what I mean? In other words, she’s not some human. Her existence is a personification of the rules of this world. To beat her, you have to expose the rules of this world and unravel them.

For example, this can be likened to learning the rules of chess by watching a game. First, take a good look at the chessboard. Then, learn the movements and roles of the pieces. Then, look for the conditions required to win at her game. When you’ve managed to reveal all of these things, her heart will be exposed. After that, you can rip it apart or crush it as you please.

…I am being quite generous. In the past, when I had a human body, it took me a hundred years to notice even this much.

This is a meager farewell gift to you, the pitiful one captured by Beato. It’s just like a spoon. A spoon can be used for more than just drinking soup. You can use it to dig through the prison you’re locked in, or as a weapon to gouge the witch’s eyes out. Of course, you can also use the spoon to continually sip the watery soup inside your eternal prison.

That’s some meta shit.

Don’t get the wrong idea. I have no intention of becoming your ally. I do feel empathy for you, but I won’t help you. It’s like I’m sitting in front of the television yelling at you on the other side, even though my voice won’t reach you.

SO, YOU UNDERSTAND THAT I AM A WITCH, RIGHT?

I HEAR YOU DON’T WORRY

I intend to enjoy this endless tale that Beato is going to weave until I tire of it. But that alone won’t hold my interest. That’s why I’ll lend you my power. It’s all so that I don’t get tired of this.

I am the cruelest witch in the world. Whoever the opponent may be, I’ll certainly make them surrender. Even if it’s Beatrice, the Endless Witch, alright…?

You are my game piece. Give it your best shot.

I WILL I PROMISE

I’ll give you advice sometimes, out of her sight. Don’t bore me, okay?

She giggles, and so our witchy tea party ends.

Finishing this unlocks the next route as well as some extra extras — a “Tips” menu is now on the main screen (and a fancy new aquatic background!).

The first new TIP is called “The Witch’s Game Record,” and it’s the list of everyone’s fates from the epilogue. Since you saw it already, no need to reproduce it here.

Next is “Winchester M1894 Sawed off,” a description of the weapon Natsuhi uses.

A sawed-off custom version of a rifle manufactured during the golden age of Winchesters. This special model more than makes up for its shorter lethal range by its portability and old-time cool factor. It can even be fired as quickly as a pistol if one works the lever action skillfully enough. Furthermore, any true lover of old western dramas can’t help but be attracted to the one-handed reload made possible by its characteristic lever handle. To match with Kinzo’s personal preferences, it was made to handle .45 long-colt bullets. The gun holds 4+1 shots.

I have no feelings about this.

Finally, there’s “The Seven Stakes of Purgatory.”

Stakes containing the seven magics that represent the seven deadly sins. In accordance with their user’s orders, they bury themselves into the desired location of the desired target with perfect accuracy. Because they flit about at ultra-high speeds and change their trajectories at will by bouncing off walls and the like, they have no blind spots, and will hit their targets without fail no matter what form of cover they might be hiding behind. Furthermore, it is possible to change the force they hit with depending on the part of the body at which they strike.

They are extremely powerful as weapons, but they cannot target pure people who have not committed one of the seven deadly sins or people who have a strong resistance to magical power.

Interesting.

Finally, there are some interesting changes to the character profiles.

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Interesting, although there’s not much to say at this point. As I said last time, there’s some indications the Golden Land isn’t so holy, but that’s all they are right now… just indications.

Beatrice also gets a profile:

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As does Bernkastel:

 

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So! A lot of information, but not quite enough to be more than interesting hints.

I look forward to teaming up with Furuderika in the future.

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27 Comments

  1. illhousen says:

    That’s some meta shit.

    You have no idea.

    So! A lot of information, but not quite enough to be more than interesting hints.

    I think, based on this tea party, there is more than enough information to figure out the truth of the mystery already: witches are Raksha from Exalted. That’s all there is to it.

    I look forward to teaming up with Furuderika in the future.

    Heh, that shall be interesting.




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  2. CrazyEd says:
    <333333333333

    I’m certain this means something to people who have played Higurashi. Hm.

    Incidentally, Furuderika’s old-school sprite is much better, IMO, although I’m not going to make a gif using it when I can crib from others, because internet.

    The one mystery of seacats I will never solve is how people prefer these sprites.

    This is a good point and frankly, whoever Bernkastel likes I don’t like, so screw you, Beatrice.

    Bernkastel’s dress is pretty cute, but Beatrice’s is way cuter, so I’m going to have to disagree and remain in the Beatrice faction on this one. Frilly dresses are very important to witchcraft.

    She does have the name Beatrice, but that doesn’t necessarily mean she is ‘one individual woman.’

    Oh, so that’s how Beatrice can be both the witch and the lost love that the witch is promising to revive. I was wondering about that. That answers my question!

    I have no feelings about this.

    I have many. It is pretty portable; it’s about the size and weight as an M1 carbine, the gun WW2 soldiers loved to carry but hated to shoot thanks to the fairly weak .30 Carbine round, it it’s full sized configuration. Based on the way it’s described, it sounds like a mare’s leg (though this one is an 1982 rather than an 1984), which when combined with its chambering in the somewhat more respectable .45 Long Colt (the round made for the Colt Peacemaker), means that Kinzo’s actually more like a large pistol than a shortened revolver. Thanks to its large size and pistol caliber chambering, this is actually probably a pretty smooth-shooting gun with very easily managed recoil, even though you’re technically shooting a rifle one handed. This might seem odd, but one of the earliest lever-action firearms was actually a pistol produced by a company that was the ancestor to both the Smith & Wesson and Winchester Repeating Arms Company.

    In fact, in America, the ATF classifies mare’s legs as either a short barreled rifle requiring an National Firearms Act tax stamp (if the firearm was manufactured as a rifle and then cut down) or a pistol that can be purchased just like any other pistol without the need for an NFA tax stamp (if manufactured in mare’s leg configuration). ATF regulations are kinda dumb!

    Anyway, it’s not really that special to reload this sort of rifle with one hand and the loop isn’t really part of it, since you’ve still got your hand grasping the stock and can reload its reloading gate (the little notched thing just above the lever in the picture above) a lot like any kind of revolver that uses a loading gate such as the Colt Peacemaker. The loop is mostly to aid in actuating the lever to cycle the action.

    But what is of note to true lovers of old westerns is the connection between mare’s leg Winchesters and Steve McQueen. The actual term “mare’s leg” comes from the 1892 Winchester used by McQueen’s character on the western that made McQueen a household name.

    They are extremely powerful as weapons, but they cannot target pure people who have not committed one of the seven deadly sins or people who have a strong resistance to magical power.

    As a reminder: Eva was killed by lust, Hideyoshi by gluttony, Kinzo by greed, Kanon by wrath, Genji by pride, Nanjo by sloth, and Kumasawa by envy. Make of this what you will.

    I look forward to teaming up with Furuderika in the future.

    Sorry, these profiles just reinforce my decision to stand with Beatrice. No witch who lists her likes as “ice cream” can be truly evil, but I have a healthy distrust of magic little girls who are a thousand years old. They’re almost always truly evil.




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    1. Falconix says:
      The one mystery of seacats I will never solve is how people prefer these sprites.

      There’s a certain charm to the old sprites – they’re amateurish, but better at conveying emotions than the PS3 ones. See Beatrice’s sprite in the last update, which showed just the right level of smug, or Bern’s calculating glare here.




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    2. Keltena says:

      The one mystery of seacats I will never solve is how people prefer these sprites.

      Speaking for myself, at least, I’d say there are two, sort of related, main reasons.

      The first is that I think the PS3 sprites lose a lot of expressiveness compared to the originals. They’re very pretty and polished, but they have this issue you often see in very polished, prettified art where the artists seem afraid to draw too extreme an expression on anyone because big emotions that distort the face aren’t as pretty, so the “uglier” expressions tend to get toned down into something that sits more nicely on a smooth, pretty anime face. In contrast, while Ryukishi07’s art is much rougher and less technically skilled, I think he actually does emotion a lot better than the PS3 artist(s) because he doesn’t make the mistake of restricting himself that way. If you compare some of Ryukishi’s sprites to their PS3 counterparts, the most striking difference after the art quality, imo, is that Ryukishi’s faces are allowed to distort with the expressions they make much more than the PS3 versions do, and as a result they feel more natural and expressive on a visceral level. If you’ve ever heard artists talk about how a realistic smile involves the whole face, not just the mouth, that’s the kind of thing I’m talking about. It’s not that glaring on most of the PS3 sprites (though I think most of them still lose to the originals in that respect because the characters are drawn with such flat faces), but some of the more extreme expressions really obviously look like someone just took a flat face and pasted on eyebrows, eyes, and a mouth making the appropriate expression, and that just kills the expressiveness.

      To give one of the more glaring examples from a scene we’ve already seen, compare Kanon’s shouting face in the original version (https://lpix.org/1747050/0700.png) vs. the PS3 version (https://lparchive.org/Umineko-no-Naku-Koro-ni/Update%2021/40-594.png). In this case you can tell clearly what emotion is being conveyed with either sprite, so that’s good. But despite being much shinier and overall better drawn in terms of technical skill, the PS3 version just looks unnatural and off in a way that’s absent from the original, because the full extent of the expression is a few super angry features pasted onto an otherwise totally blank face. (Particularly jarring is that the mouth clearly doesn’t fit in the space on his face, which only draws more attention to the fact that his face is a motionless flat surface—in reality, opening your mouth that wide would push your chin down along with it.) In contrast, the original sprite actually looks the way a guy yelling looks—it’s much more roughly drawn, but it doesn’t hit the awkward uncanny valley notes the PS3 version does because it’s a much better approximation of how faces actually work. And while both versions look a little ridiculous due to Kanon’s awkward 24/7 arm pose, I think the PS3 versions get hit with it way harder because while Ryukishi draws that pose loosely enough that it’s at least possible to read it in slightly different ways depending on context (it could plausibly be a deferential slight bow, defensive body language, or an emphatic gesture, for example), the PS3 sprites make it so stiff and angular that it feels out-of-place in almost any context, let alone a desperate, grief-fueled suicide attack. That last part mostly just means that they made a very bad choice on how to redraw that particular pose, but I think it also shows one of the problems that crops up when translating art like Ryukishi’s into a more typical, restrained anime style: some of the same stuff that works fine in the rougher style will look really bad in the more polished style if you don’t think about the differences between the two styles and what makes things work in each.

      The second and bigger issue with the PS3 portraits is that they alter or exaggerate a number of expressions into over-the-top anime creepy faces. I can’t stand those for a number of reasons. The most obvious is that they just look ridiculous, and that totally kills the mood of scenes I would otherwise take seriously. But also, they’re often major enough departures from the original expressions they’re meant to replace that they can genuinely alter the impression they give you of a character, or even the overall tone of scenes they’re used in. And that can be an especially bad thing in a game like Umineko, imo, because a lot of Umineko’s scenes—especially the more mysterious or confusing ones—rely heavily on ambiguity and plausible deniability to inspire both questions and a sense of unease in the player. Could Maria just be a weird kid with weird interests acting especially creepy right now, or is she literally possessed or some shit? Was that ominously-timed crack of thunder a supernatural omen, or are these just a bunch of scared, paranoid people ready to jump at every shadow? Etc. The PS3 version’s overenthusiasm for giving characters exaggeratedly deranged creepyfaces (which is even worse in the CGs, but we’re talking about the sprites right now) messes with that aspect of the game because it removes or reduces the ambiguity and broadcasts a much more one-sided message of how the creators of the port, at least, expect you to read that scene. I’m not saying the original sprites don’t include creepy expressions or even downright deranged ones, because they totally do. ( :) ) But the PS3 version takes a pretty wide range of creepy or potentially-creepy expressions, from “ordinary unpleasant smirk, but on a creepy person” to “creepy but perfectly physically possible smile” to “genuinely deranged grin”, and makes them all approximately the same level of uncanny valley ghoulishness. In a weird way, I think it’s kind of the flip side of the first problem I mentioned: the artist(s) don’t seem to be willing to draw a character with an garden-variety ugly sneer on their face, but they are totally up for redoing that same expression as a downright ghoulish smirk with an inhumanly wide mouth and dark shadowing on the brow.

      I think the clearest examples I could give here are mostly stuff Act’s not up to yet, but for a less egregious example, compare Maria’s creepy smile with the original (https://lpix.org/1744043/0575.png) vs. PS3 (https://lparchive.org/Umineko-no-Naku-Koro-ni/Update%2017/34-492.png) sprites. The original is definitely an unpleasant expression, and it’s creepy as hell in context due to the scenes it’s used in and the fact that it’s a complete change in Maria’s demeanor. But it’s also a totally normal expression a human could make. The PS3 version, though… The artists seem to have chosen to cross straight into the uncanny valley in order to sell the “creepy” factor, as well as sacrifice some of the original’s expressiveness—note how they stretch her grin to look subtly too wide for her face, and that they seem to have adjusted her expression to look less happy and malicious in favor of unsettling calm. The result is that while Maria’s original sprite just looks like a girl with an unpleasant grin, and the real creepy/unnatural factor is her inexplicable change in demeanor, I find Maria’s PS3 hard to read as anything but “this girl is fucking possessed”—at least by the spirit of creepy anime girls, if not by a witch. :P

      Also the PS3 sprites erase Battler’s anime hair and that’s terrible.

      (The one thing I really do like about the PS3 sprites is that they show off the relative sizes of all the characters much more clearly. Ryukishi’s original sprites all cluster around roughly the same scale with fairly minor height variation, probably because drawing them all at the same scale makes it easier for him to keep the quality consistent between characters, and I think it’s pretty cool how in the PS3 sprites you can really see that—for example—Battler and his dad are super tall, or just how tiny Bernkastel is compared to almost anyone. And there are some smaller issues with Ryukishi’s art that the improvement in technical quality helps fix, such as the thing Act pointed out where it’s not apparent that the kids are kids from the art; in the PS3 version, it’s clearer at a glance that they’re young. Or Kyrie’s design—I mean, her boob-hugging tie is absurd in any context, but it doesn’t stand out quite as jarringly in her PS3 sprites because the artist(s) there aren’t as bad at drawing boobs as Ryukishi.)




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      1. Act says:

        This is an excellent summation, and to tack on, I think Bernkastel’s PS sprite in partiuclar really lacks charcater. She looks distant and ethereal, but the original one has a real expression of disdain and unhappiness that is so important to her character. The prettified, removed face just isn’t Rika. I also like that the old one looks much more like a little girl, while the new one makes it look like she’s aged.




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      2. illhousen says:

        The second and bigger issue with the PS3 portraits is that they alter or exaggerate a number of expressions into over-the-top anime creepy faces.

        Yep.

        Manga/anime manages to be somehow even worse on occasion, especially, again, with Natsuhi. (Can’t find a decent screenshot, just know that it exist. Also, while googling, stumbled upon splash pages from – I presume – PS3 version with Natsuhi and Eva, and dear God are they awful.)




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        1. Act says:

          TBH for both sets of ‘new’ sprites I get the sense the artist never read the story.




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  3. Aumanor says:
    So, here’s a linguistic note: lambda delta translates to 34 in the Greek numeral system. Three-four. Hmmmmm.

     

    Also, for anyone playing along with a voiced version, Beatrice is voiced by Ohara Sayaka, who also plays Irisviel in Fate/Zero (and also a whole lot of other prominent roles in other animes but that one leapt out at me in particular). I was genuinely shocked when someone in the thread remarked that they share the voice actress.




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    1. CrazyEd says:
      And yet another reason to be in the Beatrice Faction. 80% of my enjoyment of Fate/Zero was Irisviel, due in no small part to her voice acting.



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    2. Falconix says:
      So, here’s a linguistic note: lambda delta translates to 34 in the Greek numeral system. Three-four. Hmmmmm.

      I remember a lot of fanart right after this Episode went out for Lambdadelta, and yes, fanartists did just assume she would look exactly like Takano.

      Beatrice is voiced by Ohara Sayaka, who also plays Irisviel in Fate/Zero

      She also played Ichihara Yuuko in XXXHolic, who’s a lot closer range-wise to Beatrice.




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      1. CrazyEd says:
        She also played Ichihara Yuuko in XXXHolic, who’s a lot closer range-wise to Beatrice.

        That’s not that surprising when you think about it. They both have the same witchy atmosphere about them. If Beatrice was a classical Japanese beauty instead of a reverse-weaboo’s dream girl, she’d probably look a hell of a lot like Yuuko.

        They even have the same pipe and, if I recall, butterfly motif.




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      2. Act says:

        I actually originally had a line in here speculating that Lambadelta was Takano but apparently took it out. Not sure why. Guess I got cold feet about the guess.

        edit: Nope, it’s there. IDK where my head is. 

        Beatrice meets Yuuko would be an amazing crossover.




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        1. illhousen says:

          Beatrice meets Yuuko would be an amazing crossover.

          Hold this thought until we learn more about the witches in a few episodes.




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    3. Socordya says:

      So, here’s a linguistic note: lambda delta translates to 34 in the Greek numeral system. Three-four. Hmmmmm.

      So the author himself is asking people to draw porn of her?




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  4. Cosmogone says:
    Hello, Act. I’m rather new to this site and I’d like to thank you for your reviews. In particular, this read-through of Umineko encouraged me to read along (though I picked the manga, not the VN, so there might be some differences). Basically, thank you for an excellent recomendation.

    I… strongly disagree with you on a point so far, but, since I’m 99% convinced my theory will show itself true in the end, I’m not sure you’d like to hear it. Please let me know if you do or if this kind of stuff is as bad as spoilers.

    >>She does have the name Beatrice, but that doesn’t necessarily mean she is ‘one individual woman.’

    !!!! Hey, this was phrased rather differently in the manga.

    >>Next is “Winchester M1894 Sawed off,” a description of the weapon Natsuhi uses.[…] I have no feelings about this.

    I have feelings about this, please let me gunsplain!! This is such a jerk move, Ryukishi, it’s not even funny.




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    1. CrazyEd says:
      I already did a bit of gunsplaining above, so do it, nerd.



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      1. Cosmogone says:
        Oh! Sorry, didn’t read the comments. Yeah, your explanation pretty much covers it, except for a few detail I’m gonna add. :)



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    2. Cosmogone says:
      UPD. Just saw CrazyEd’s comment. He covered covered it very well, but I’m gonna specify a couple of details, if nobody minds.

      First, there are differences between these weapons based on the type of shotgun they originally were (Winchester vs. Mosin I’m familiar with), the metod of shortening (sawed-off vs. short-barreled, aka modified in your garage vs. fabric-produced with engineers’ superision), how short you cut the barrel, if you shorten the stock as well, etc. However, they almost always have a very strong recoil. They’re also really damn loud, with no way to put a silencer on one.

      Most importantly, the VN’s blurb breacher the rules of fair play by not mentioning the single most prominent feat sawed-off shotguns are famous for. Their appeal to both partisans and gang members isn’t the portability, but the deadliness. They sacrifice range for impact. And by “trade” I mean it’s still enough to kill a horse from 150 metres. Seriously, I can’t overemphasize how big the holes it leaves are.

      There are a few possible implications of this, but most of them dubious. I see only one sure detail so far. Make of this what you will.




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    3. Act says:

      I… strongly disagree with you on a point so far, but, since I’m 99% convinced my theory will show itself true in the end, I’m not sure you’d like to hear it. Please let me know if you do or if this kind of stuff is as bad as spoilers.

      Enjoy basking in my ignorance!

      Well, if you’re reading along with me, it can’t be a spoiler. I’ve been kind of just glossing over the speculative comments so I don’t get any ideas from them, but it’s totally valid to post them for discussion. That said, if you’ve read the manga, then I would count it as a spoiler.




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      1. Cosmogone says:
        Nah, I have just finished the first arc of the manga (it’s somehow much longer than the VN, despite apparently missing a few scenes).

        Thank god, I can get out this theory without ruining anyone’s fun. I think my head would’ve exploded otherwise.

        I just think it’s pretty clear Beatrice isn’t actually responsible for the “ritual” deaths. Firstly, because Kinzo’s poem is written in imperative, as a sort of guide. While it mentions Beatrice in the end, its main bulk doesn’t seem directed at her at all. From a metaphysical standpoint, it also wouldn’t make much sense for Beatrice to fulfill conditions of her own revival. There’s a stark contrast between what the poem/riddle implies and what Beatrice states as the goal, which only makes me think that she’s outright lying to distract everyone from something else that’s going on.

        Now, this would apparently still leave her responsible for later deaths, but I’m about 70% sure those aren’t on her, either. It’s mainly because of how weirdly Bernkastel phrases her jedgement of Beatrice’s magic, which doesn’t seem to be any sort of idiom, either. When we want to express someone’s cheating we say they “play with weighted dice”, but “she never lets the dice fall from her hand”? This is not only bizarre but also invokes a very different mental image. The former is that of a cardsharper, the latter of a stage magician (all the coin tricks, etc). Ultimately, what I think Bernkastel is hinting at is that Beatrice, at least in her current state, simply doesn’t have any feasible influence over real world and uses some sort of tricks to mess with people instead.

        Sorry for this rant, had to get it out of my system.




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  5. illhousen says:

    Finally, there’s “The Seven Stakes of Purgatory.”

    Speaking of Purgatorio, it is now evident that the name Beatrice is a reference to Divine Comedy, where Beatrice met the narrator at the highest levels of Purgatory and guided him into Paradise.

    Any thoughts on how it plays into the narrative and specifically the Golden Land imagery?




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    1. Act says:

      Speaking of Purgatorio, it is now evident that the name Beatrice is a reference to Divine Comedy, 

      I… did not make this connection. I have never been so ashamed, it’s so obvious.

      That’s… really interesting. Right now what it feels like is a subversion of expectations where the Paradise she’s leading them to is false, but at the same time I don’t feel like that’s right. It’s too neat. Hmmmm.

      I wish I’d noticed that before I wrote up the first posts for next route >.>




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  6. ??? says:
    I “played” the first two games with the older translation, and (including in the first game, so this isn’t a spoiler), I remember the phrase “the lost love” being translated differently, and I looked it up again and it was “the love that was lost”. This makes me think that it’s referring to the resurrection of dead love rather than the resurrection of a dead loved one – i.e., the emotional bonds themselves.

    Which makes it interesting that Maria chose to resurrect her mother’s love rather than to resurrect her mother…




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    1. Keltena says:

      I think my translation uses “the lost love” like Act’s, but yeah, I always assumed it was supposed to be intentionally ambiguous in that sense. I don’t think there’s any other way you can read Maria’s wish in the ending roll, considering Rosa was just as dead as Shannon and Kanon and yet her wish is the only one that words it as “the lost love of her mother” rather than “the mother she lost”. Which pretty much makes that line the biggest punch in the heart all game so far, yeah. D:




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    2. Act says:

      This makes me think that it’s referring to the resurrection of dead love rather than the resurrection of a dead loved one – i.e., the emotional bonds themselves.

      This interpretation actually didn’t occur to me until Maria’s wish, where it was made obvious it could be interpreted that way. I think it makes sense Maria would want the mother she never had instead of the one she got, and she’s smart enough to realize she could make that wish. Smarter than me, apparently.




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